INSTITUTE OF NARRATIVE PRACTICE


 

INSTITUTE OF NARRATIVE PRACTICE


 

INSTITUTE OF NARRATIVE PRACTICE

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS

TORONTO

NEW ORLEANS

TESTIMONIALS

Her program was fantastic. I’d recommend it to coaches, leaders and teams looking to move themselves forward in deep and sustainable ways.

 

MICHAEL BOYDELL

Leadership Advisor

It is my pleasure to welcome you to the Institute of Narrative Practice, an inspiration of my dedication to embracing my passion; sharing, teaching and co-creating. I am looking forward to sharing the empowerment and freedom of the narrative practice with you.

Very soon, you will have the opportunity to join our online learning program, and upcoming international workshops as well. I will keep you posted!

I welcome your comments and feedback as I invite you to partake in this journey.

Warmly,
Trine

ABOUT THE NARRATIVE APPROACH

Resource-based & Forward-looking
 – The narrative practitioner seeks to help people identify their values as well as the skills, resources and knowledge they practice by living their lives, so they can effectively take steps to take the power away from whatever problems they face and embark on the kind of life they want.

As professionals we co-author a new narrative by investigating the history of those qualities and how they may be applied going forward.

A JOURNEY THAT ENLIGHTENED MY PERSPECTIVE

When I first set sails on my narrative journey, my life was great. I had my MBA, my career in corporate communication, and I had been coaching for several years. Being schooled in business, I was constantly assessing my world in terms of cost/benefit, and I knew there was a right way and consequently a less right way of solving problems. On my first day of narrative training, I entered the building thinking “I’ve got this.” It was going to be another education, more tools in my toolkit and it would look great on my resume.

When I was told that there is not one, but many truths and that each of us hold our own, I wanted to scream “NO!”. Of course the truth exists. We all know that stress is bad and how to treat it. We know that problems are annoying roadblocks that need to be removed, and may be expressions of ways we are holding ourselves back. We know that people have certain personality traits and identity is something we have or are. This perspective was undermining everything I thought I knew. How couldn’t something be unilaterally and unambiguously accepted as true? Isn’t it true that stress is bad? Isn’t it true that problems are roadblocks that need to be removed?’

I didn’t “have” it. Yet.

Through studying, co-creating and practicing narrative therapy, I discovered that I, and we, are not our problems – the problems are the problem. Problems may move into our lives, fill up the living room with their moving boxes, close the curtains on the view, and block our access to what is important to us. However, there will always be nooks and crannies that they haven’t found, and it is from these resourceful places that we can create a platform to send the problems on permanent vacations.

When we as professionals talk about problems as inhabiting people (“You are/I am depressed, stressed, sad, etc.), and as something we need to take responsibility for removing from our lives, we inadvertently allow the problems to dominate our identity or sense of self. Thus, the problem becomes the lens through which we perceive ourselves and others. The problem story becomes dominant and totalizes the identity story, often to the detriment of personal agency.  Personal agency is the feeling that options and skills are available to us and can be pursued.

As professionals, we are usually given power by our conversation partners to define what is right and what is wrong. I.e. Stress is bad and must be ridden. So, what might happen if we were to explore what values and strivings the stress is threatening? Within the narrative perspective, a problem can only be a problem, if our values and/or hopes are trampled on or threatened.

In my experience, narrative practice offers great personal as well as professional freedom to co-create meaning with the person(s) with whom we talk. Because of its playful use of metaphors, this approach allows for abundant curiosity and exploration. Narrative practice is a powerful tool for transformational conversations. For me, it is liberating to approach the world not with answers, but with questions.

I hope that you will join me on the narrative journey!

REGISTER NOW FOR THE ONLINE CLASSES

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